Andon 47

March 1994

Andon 47

EDITORIAL: Inrô, decorative containers for medicine or seals, were made and used almost exclusively in Japan. Even on the remote Ryûkyû Islands craftsmen produced inrô decorated with lacquer extracted from local trees and seashells. The Ryûkyûan inrô were not so subtle and refined as those produced by lacquerers from the mainland but they reflect the charm of folk art from quite a different artistic and cultural background. Else Kress, a well-known expert on inrô, shows us several examples of these relatively rare Ryûkyûan inrô and explains the various techniques used to produce them. For Andon the step from inrô to fan prints is only a small one. Ellis Tinios has done some new research on his favourite subject, half-length actor portraits. He treats us to a detailed description of three not yet published early uchiwa prints designed by Kunisada. More than other ukiyo-e prints fan prints have suffered from wear and tear and comparatively few have survived in good condition. But other Japanese prints may also suffer from careless handling and ignorance. We have asked Pamela de Tristan, who is an experienced conservator of Japanese prints, to give us some practícal advice on the care and conservation of Japanese prints. She has supplemented her advice wilh a practical
example that shows how skilled conservation and restoration may contribute to the appreciation and survival of the ukiyo-e heritage.

You are here

Sponsors of our Society